Queen Victoria , livre ebook

icon

49

pages

icon

English

icon

Ebooks

2010

Écrit par

Publié par

icon jeton

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Lire un extrait
Lire un extrait

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne En savoir plus

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
icon

49

pages

icon

English

icon

Ebook

2010

icon jeton

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Lire un extrait
Lire un extrait

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne En savoir plus

This book, a contemporary account from the time, chronicles the life of Queen Victoria (1819 to 1901). She married all nine of her children into the royal houses of Europe, gave her name to an era, ruled over England at a time of great change, survived assassination attempts, became the longest reigning monarch and more. This excellent book is a fascinating read about the woman behind the British Empire.
Voir Alternate Text

Publié par

Date de parution

16 juin 2010

Nombre de lectures

1

EAN13

9781849891189

Langue

English

Title Page
QUEEN VICTORIA
By
E. GORDON BROWNE
Publisher Information
Published by Andrews UK Limited 2010
www.andrewsuk.com
This digital edition, including artwork, typography and formatting is copyright Andrews UK Limited 2010.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be copied, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the written permission of Andrews UK Limited.



CHAPTER I: A Look Back
In the old legend of Rip Van Winkle with which the American writer Washington Irving has made us so familiar, the ne’er-do-weel Rip wanders off into the Kaatskill Mountains with his dog and gun in order to escape from his wife’s scolding tongue. Here he meets the spectre crew of Captain Hudson, and, after partaking of their hospitality, falls into a deep sleep which lasts for twenty years. The latter part of the story describes the changes which he finds on his return to his native village: nearly all the old, familiar faces are gone; manners, dress, and speech are all changed. He feels like a stranger in a strange land.
Now, it is a good thing sometimes to take a look back, to try to count over the changes for good or for evil which have taken place in this country of ours; to try to understand clearly why the reign of a great Queen should have left its mark upon our history in such a way that men speak of the Victorian Age as one of the greatest ages that have ever been.
If an Elizabethan had been asked whether he considered the Queen of England a great woman or not, he would undoubtedly have answered “Yes,” and given very good reasons for his answer. It was not for nothing that the English almost worshipped their Queen in “those spacious times of great Elizabeth.” Edmund Spenser, one of the world’s great poets, hymned her as “fayre Elisa” and “the flowre of Virgins”:
Helpe me to blaze Her worthy praise; Which, in her sexe doth all excell!
Throughout her long reign, courtiers, statesmen, soldiers, and people all united in serving her gladly and to the best of their powers.
Yet she could at times prove herself to be hard, cruel, and vindictive; she was mean, even miserly, when money was wanted for men or ships; she was excessively vain, loved dress and finery, and was often proud almost beyond bearing.
Notwithstanding all her faults, she was the best beloved of all English monarchs because of her never-failing courage and strength of mind, and she made the Crown respected, feared, and loved as no other ruler had done before her, and none other, save Queen Victoria, has reigned as she did in her people’s hearts.
She lived for her country, and her country’s love and admiration were her reward. During her reign the seas were swept clear of foreign foes, and her country took its place in the front rank of Great Powers. Hers was the Golden Age of Literature, of Adventure and Learning, an age of great men and women, a New England.
If an Elizabethan Rip Van Winkle had fallen asleep and awakened again at the opening of Victoria’s reign, more than 200 years later, what would he have found? England still a mighty Power, it is true, scarcely yet recovered from the long war against Napoleon, with Nelson and Wellington enthroned as the national heroes. But the times were bad in many ways, for it was “a time of ugliness: ugly religion, ugly law, ugly relations between rich and poor, ugly clothes, ugly furniture.”
The England of that day, it must be remembered, was the England described so faithfully in Charles Dickens’ early works. It was far from being the England we know now. In 1836 appeared the first number of Mr Pickwick’s travels. The Pickwick Papers is not a great work of humour merely, for in its pages we see England and the early Victorians - a strange country to us - in which they lived.
It is an England of old inns and stagecoaches, where “manners and roads were very rough”; where men were still cast into prison for debt and lived and died there; where the execution of a criminal still took place in public; where little children of tender years were condemned to work in the depths of coal-pits, and amid the clang and roar of machinery. It was a hard, cruel age. No longer did the people look up to and reverence their monarch as their leader. England had yet to pass through a long and bitter period of ‘strife and stress,’ of war between rich and poor, of many and bewildering changes. The introduction of coal, steam, and mechanism was rapidly changing the character of the whole country. The revenue had grown from about £19,000,000 in 1792 to £105,000,000 in 1815, and there seemed to be no limit to the national wealth and resources.
But these very changes which enriched some few were the cause of misery and poverty to struggling thousands. Machinery had ruined the spinning-wheel industry and reduced the price of cloth; the price of corn had risen, and, after the close of the great war, other nations were free once again to compete against our country in the markets where we so long had possessed the monopoly of trade.
The period which followed the year 1815 was one of incessant struggle for reform, and chiefly the reform of a Parliament which no longer represented the people’s wishes. Considerably more than half the members were not elected at all, but were recommended by patrons.
The average price of a seat in Parliament was £5000 for a so-called ‘rotten borough.’ Scotland returned forty-five members and Cornwall forty-four members to Parliament! The reformers also demanded the abolition of the ‘taxes on knowledge,’ by which was meant the stamp duty of fourpence on every copy of a newspaper, a duty of threepence on every pound of paper, and a heavy tax upon advertisements. The new Poor Laws aroused bitter discontent. Instead of receiving payment of money for relief of poverty, as had formerly been the case, the poor and needy were now sent to the ‘Union’ workhouse.
A series of bad harvests was the cause of great migrations to the factory towns, and the already large ranks of the unemployed grew greater day by day. The poverty and wretchedness of the working class is painted vividly for us by Carlyle when he speaks of “half a million handloom weavers, working 15 hours a day, in perpetual inability to procure thereby enough of the coarsest food; Scotch farm-labourers, who ‘in districts the half of whose husbandry is that of cows, taste no milk, can procure no milk’ . . . the working-classes can no longer go on without government, without being actually guided and governed.”
Such was Victoria’s England when she ascended the throne, a young girl, nineteen years of age.
CHAPTER II: Childhood Days
On the western side of Kensington Gardens stands the old Palace, built originally in the solid Dutch style for King William and Mary. The great architect, Sir Christopher Wren, made notable additions to it, and it was still further extended in 1721 for George the First.
Within its walls passed away both William and his Queen, Queen Anne and her husband, and George the Second. After this time it ceased to be a royal residence.
The charm of Kensington Gardens, with its beautiful walks and secluded sylvan nooks - the happy hunting-ground of London children and the home of ‘Peter Pan’ - has inspired many writers to sing its praises:
In this lone, open glade I lie, Screen’d by deep boughs on either hand; And at its end, to stay the eye, Those black-crown’d, red-boled pine trees stand! Birds here make song, each bird has his, Across the girding city’s hum. How green under the boughs it is! How thick the tremulous sheep cries come! Here at my feet what wonders pass, What endless, active life is here! What blowing daisies, fragrant grass! An air-stirred forest, fresh and clear. MATTHEW ARNOLD
Beaconsfield spoke of its “sublime sylvan solitude superior to the cedars of Lebanon, and inferior only in extent to the chestnut forests of Anatolia.”
Kensington Palace was the birthplace of Queen Victoria, and in the garden walks she used to play, little knowing that she would one day be Queen of England. Her doll’s house and toys are still preserved in the rooms which she inhabited as a little girl.
KENSINGTON PALACE
Four years had passed since the battle of Waterloo when the Princess Victoria was born, and England was settling down to a time of peace after long years of warfare.
In 1830 George the Fourth died, and was succeeded by his brother, the Duke of Clarence, as William the Fourth, the ‘sailor king.’ Though not in any respect a great monarch, he proved himself to be a good king and one who was always wishful to do the best that lay in his power for the country’s good.
He was exceedingly hospitable, and gave dinners to thousands of his friends and acquaintances during the year, particularly inviting all his old messmates of the Navy. He had two daughters by his marriage, and as these both died young it was evident that the Princess Victoria might some day succeed to the throne.
Her father, the Duke of Kent, married the Dowager Princess of Leiningen, who was the sister of Prince Leopold, afterward King of the Belgians. As a young man the Duke had seen much service, for when he was only seventeen years of age he entered the Hanoverian army, where the discipline was severe and rigid. He afterward served in the West Indies and Canada, and on his return to England he was made a peer with the title of Duke of Kent. He was afterward General and Commander-in-Chief in Canada and Governor of Gibraltar.
At the latter place his love of order and discipline naturally made him unpopular, and, owing to strong feeling on the part of the troops, it was considered wise to recall the Duke in 1803.
In 1816 he settled in Brussels, and soon afterward met his future wif

Voir Alternate Text
How To Sing
Category

Ebooks

How To Sing

Lilli Lehmann

How To Sing Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Musique

How To Sing

Lilli Lehmann

Book

68 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth
Category

Ebooks

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

Lucy Aikin

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Biographies

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

Lucy Aikin

Book

303 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Don Quixote
Category

Ebooks

Don Quixote

Cervantes Saavedra Miguel De

Don Quixote Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Don Quixote

Cervantes Saavedra Miguel De

Book

456 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Barchester Towers
Category

Ebooks

Barchester Towers

Anthony Trollope

Barchester Towers Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Barchester Towers

Anthony Trollope

Book

228 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Wives and Daughters
Category

Ebooks

Wives and Daughters

Elizabeth Gaskell

Wives and Daughters Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Wives and Daughters

Elizabeth Gaskell

Book

346 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four
Category

Ebooks

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Romans policiers, polars, thrillers

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Book

59 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Symbolism of Freemasonry
Category

Ebooks

Symbolism of Freemasonry

Albert Mackey

Symbolism of Freemasonry Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Esotérisme et paranormal

Symbolism of Freemasonry

Albert Mackey

Book

142 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes
Category

Ebooks

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes

Maria Parloa

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Cuisine et vins

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes

Maria Parloa

Book

46 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Celtic Fairy Tales
Category

Ebooks

Celtic Fairy Tales

Joseph Jacobs

Celtic Fairy Tales Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

SF et fantasy

Celtic Fairy Tales

Joseph Jacobs

Book

81 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Henry VIII and his Court
Category

Ebooks

Henry VIII and his Court

Luise Muhlbach

Henry VIII and his Court Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Littérature érotique

Henry VIII and his Court

Luise Muhlbach

Book

171 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Queen Victoria
Category

Ebooks

Queen Victoria

Gordon Brown E

Queen Victoria Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Histoire

Queen Victoria

Gordon Brown E

Book

49 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Far From the Madding Crowd
Category

Ebooks

Far From the Madding Crowd

Thomas Hardy

Far From the Madding Crowd Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Far From the Madding Crowd

Thomas Hardy

Book

224 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
History of London
Category

Ebooks

History of London

Walter Besant

History of London Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Histoire

History of London

Walter Besant

Book

130 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Dracula
Category

Ebooks

Dracula

Bram Stoker

Dracula Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Dracula

Bram Stoker

Book

172 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear
Category

Ebooks

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Romans policiers, polars, thrillers

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Book

84 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents
Alternate Text