Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes , livre ebook

icon

46

pages

icon

English

icon

Ebooks

2010

Écrit par

Publié par

icon jeton

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Lire un extrait
Lire un extrait

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne En savoir plus

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
icon

46

pages

icon

English

icon

Ebook

2010

icon jeton

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Lire un extrait
Lire un extrait

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne En savoir plus

This excellent book, specifically formatted for today's e-readers, is a wonderful treasure-trove of recipes involving chocolate. Despite being first published before the second world war, the sweets, cakes, desserts and dishes contained within these pages are as tasty now as when they were first concocted. Allow your taste-buds to experience the wonder of chocolate, cocoa and candy, and be amazed at the variety that you can cook!
Voir Alternate Text

Publié par

Date de parution

07 septembre 2010

Nombre de lectures

0

EAN13

9781849892087

Langue

English

Title Page

CHOCOLATE & COCOA RECIPES

By
Miss Parloa


And


HOME MADE CANDY RECIPES

By
Janet McKenzie Hill

Publisher Information


Digital Edition converted and published by
Andrews UK Limited 2010
www.andrewsuk.com

This Digital Edition, including all typography, formatting and layout is copyright 2010 Andrews UK. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior written consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published, and without a similar condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.

Cocoa and Chocolate

The term “Cocoa,” a corruption of “Cacao,” is almost universally used in English-speaking countries to designate the seeds of the small tropical tree known to botanists as THEOBROMA CACAO, from which a great variety of preparations under the name of cocoa and chocolate for eating and drinking are made. The name “Chocolatl” is nearly the same in most European languages, and is taken from the Mexican name of the drink, “Chocolate” or “Cacahuatl.” The Spaniards found chocolate in common use among the Mexicans at the time of the invasion under Cortez in 1519, and it was introduced into Spain immediately after. The Mexicans not only used chocolate as a staple article of food, but they used the seeds of the cacao tree as a medium of exchange.
No better evidence could be offered of the great advance which has been made in recent years in the knowledge of dietetics than the remarkable increase in the consumption of cocoa and chocolate in this country. The amount retained for home consumption in 1860 was only 1,181,054 pounds - about 3-5 of an ounce for each inhabitant. The amount retained for home consumption for the year ending Dec. 31, 1908, was 93,956,721 pounds - over 16 ounces for each inhabitant.
Although there was a marked increase in the consumption of tea and coffee during the same period, the ratio of increase fell far below that of cocoa. It is evident that the coming American is going to be less of a tea and coffee drinker, and more of a cocoa and chocolate drinker. This is the natural result of a better knowledge of the laws of health, and of the food value of a beverage which nourishes the body while it also stimulates the brain.
Baron von Liebig, one of the best-known writers on dietetics, says:
“It is a perfect food, as wholesome as delicious, a beneficient restorer of exhausted power; but its quality must be good and it must be carefully prepared. It is highly nourishing and easily digested, and is fitted to repair wasted strength, preserve health, and prolong life. It agrees with dry temperaments and convalescents; with mothers who nurse their children; with those whose occupations oblige them to undergo severe mental strains; with public speakers, and with all those who give to work a portion of the time needed for sleep. It soothes both stomach and brain, and for this reason, as well as for others, it is the best friend of those engaged in literary pursuits.”
M. Brillat-Savarin, in his entertaining and valuable work, Physiologie du Goût , says: “Chocolate came over the mountains [from Spain to France] with Anne of Austria, daughter of Philip III and queen of Louis XIII. The Spanish monks also spread the knowledge of it by the presents they made to their brothers in France. It is well known that Linnæus called the fruit of the cocoa tree theobroma , ‘food for the gods.’ The cause of this emphatic qualification has been sought, and attributed by some to the fact that he was extravagantly fond of chocolate; by others to his desire to please his confessor; and by others to his gallantry, a queen having first introduced it into France.
“The Spanish ladies of the New World, it is said, carried their love for chocolate to such a degree that, not content with partaking of it several times a day, they had it sometimes carried after them to church. This favoring of the senses often drew upon them the censures of the bishop; but the Reverend Father Escobar, whose metaphysics were as subtle as his morality was accommodating, declared, formally, that a fast was not broken by chocolate prepared with water; thus wire-drawing, in favor of his penitents, the ancient adage, ‘ Liquidum non frangit jejunium. ’
“Time and experience,” he says further, “have shown that chocolate, carefully prepared, is an article of food as wholesome as it is agreeable; that it is nourishing, easy of digestion, and does not possess those qualities injurious to beauty with which coffee has been reproached; that it is excellently adapted to persons who are obliged to a great concentration of intellect; in the toils of the pulpit or the bar, and especially to travellers; that it suits the most feeble stomach; that excellent effects have been produced by it in chronic complaints, and that it is a last resource in affections of the pylorus.
“Some persons complain of being unable to digest chocolate; others, on the contrary, pretend that it has not sufficient nourishment, and that the effect disappears too soon. It is probable that the former have only themselves to blame, and that the chocolate which they use is of bad quality or badly made; for good and well-made chocolate must suit every stomach which retains the slightest digestive power.
“In regard to the others, the remedy is an easy one: they should reinforce their breakfast with a pâté , a cutlet, or a kidney, moisten the whole with a good draught of soconusco chocolate, and thank God for a stomach of such superior activity.
“This gives me an opportunity to make an observation whose accuracy may be depended upon.
“After a good, complete, and copious breakfast, if we take, in addition, a cup of well-made chocolate, digestion will be perfectly accomplished in three hours, and we may dine whenever we like. Out of zeal for science, and by dint of eloquence, I have induced many ladies to try this experiment. They all declared, in the beginning, that it would kill them; but they have all thriven on it and have not failed to glorify their teacher.
“The people who make constant use of chocolate are the ones who enjoy the most steady health, and are the least subject to a multitude of little ailments which destroy the comfort of life; their plumpness is also more equal. These are two advantages which every one may verify among his own friends, and wherever the practice is in use.”
In corroboration of M. Brillat-Savarin’s statement as to the value of chocolate as an aid to digestion, we may quote from one of Mme. de Sévigné’s letters to her daughter:
“I took chocolate night before last to digest my dinner, in order to have a good supper. I took some yesterday for nourishment, so as to be able to fast until night. What I consider amusing about chocolate is that it acts according to the wishes of the one who takes it.”
Chocolate appears to have been highly valued as a remedial agent by the leading physicians of that day. Christoph Ludwig Hoffman wrote a treatise entitled, “Potus Chocolate,” in which he recommended it in many diseases, and instanced the case of Cardinal Richelieu, who, he stated, was cured of general atrophy by its use.
A French officer who served in the West Indies for a period of fifteen years, during the early part of the last century, wrote, as the result of his personal observations, a treatise on “The Natural History of Chocolate, Being a distinct and Particular Account of the Cacao Tree, its Growth and Culture, and the Preparation, Excellent Properties, and Medicinal Virtues of its Fruit,” which received the approbation of the Regent of the Faculty of Medicine at Paris, and which was translated and published in London, in 1730. After describing the different methods of raising and curing the fruit and preparing it for food (which it is not worth while to reproduce here, as the methods have essentially changed since that time), he goes on to demonstrate, as the result of actual experiment, that chocolate is a substance “very temperate, very nourishing, and of easy digestion; very proper to repair the exhausted spirits and decayed strength; and very suitable to preserve the health and prolong the lives of old men....
“I could produce several instances,” he says, “in favor of this excellent nourishment; but I shall content myself with two only, equally certain and decisive, in proof of its goodness. The first is an experiment of chocolate’s being taken for the only nourishment - made by a surgeon’s wife of Martinico. She had lost, by a very deplorable accident, her lower jaw, which reduced her to such a condition that she did not know how to subsist. She was not capable of taking anything solid, and not rich enough to live upon jellies and nourishing broths. In this strait she determined to take three dishes of chocolate, prepared after the manner of the country, one in the morning, one at noon, and one at night. There chocolate is nothing else but cocoa kernels dissolved in hot water, with sugar, and seasoned with a bit of cinnamon. This new way of life succeeded so well that she has lived a long while since, more lively and robust than before this accident.
“I had the second relation from a gentleman of Martinico, and one of my friends not capable of a falsity. He assured me that in his neighborhood an infant of four months old unfortunately lost his nurse, and its parents not being able to put it to another, resolved, through necessity, to feed it with chocolate. The success was very happy, for the infant came on to a miracle, and was neither less healthy nor less vigorous than those who are brought up by the best nurses.
“Before chocolate was known in Europe, good old wine was called the milk

Voir Alternate Text
How To Sing
Category

Ebooks

How To Sing

Lilli Lehmann

How To Sing Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Musique

How To Sing

Lilli Lehmann

Book

68 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth
Category

Ebooks

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

Lucy Aikin

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Biographies

Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

Lucy Aikin

Book

303 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Don Quixote
Category

Ebooks

Don Quixote

Cervantes Saavedra Miguel De

Don Quixote Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Don Quixote

Cervantes Saavedra Miguel De

Book

456 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Barchester Towers
Category

Ebooks

Barchester Towers

Anthony Trollope

Barchester Towers Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Barchester Towers

Anthony Trollope

Book

228 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Wives and Daughters
Category

Ebooks

Wives and Daughters

Elizabeth Gaskell

Wives and Daughters Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Wives and Daughters

Elizabeth Gaskell

Book

346 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four
Category

Ebooks

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Romans policiers, polars, thrillers

Sherlock Holmes - The Sign of the Four

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Book

59 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Symbolism of Freemasonry
Category

Ebooks

Symbolism of Freemasonry

Albert Mackey

Symbolism of Freemasonry Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Esotérisme et paranormal

Symbolism of Freemasonry

Albert Mackey

Book

142 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes
Category

Ebooks

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes

Maria Parloa

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Cuisine et vins

Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes

Maria Parloa

Book

46 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Celtic Fairy Tales
Category

Ebooks

Celtic Fairy Tales

Joseph Jacobs

Celtic Fairy Tales Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

SF et fantasy

Celtic Fairy Tales

Joseph Jacobs

Book

81 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Henry VIII and his Court
Category

Ebooks

Henry VIII and his Court

Luise Muhlbach

Henry VIII and his Court Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Littérature érotique

Henry VIII and his Court

Luise Muhlbach

Book

171 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Queen Victoria
Category

Ebooks

Queen Victoria

Gordon Brown E

Queen Victoria Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Histoire

Queen Victoria

Gordon Brown E

Book

49 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Far From the Madding Crowd
Category

Ebooks

Far From the Madding Crowd

Thomas Hardy

Far From the Madding Crowd Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Far From the Madding Crowd

Thomas Hardy

Book

224 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
History of London
Category

Ebooks

History of London

Walter Besant

History of London Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Histoire

History of London

Walter Besant

Book

130 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Dracula
Category

Ebooks

Dracula

Bram Stoker

Dracula Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Classiques

Dracula

Bram Stoker

Book

172 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear
Category

Ebooks

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear Alternate Text
Category

Ebooks

Romans policiers, polars, thrillers

Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear

Arthur Conan Doyle Sir

Book

84 pages

Flag

English

icon play Lire
icon play Infos
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents
Alternate Text