The Home and the World , livre ebook

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The Home and the World (1916) is a novel by Bengali author Rabindranath Tagore. Written after Tagore received the 1913 Nobel Prize in Literature, the novel dramatizes the Swadeshi movement for Indian independence from British rule. Through the lens of one family, Tagore illuminates the conflict between Western culture and Indian nationalism while exploring the complex relationships of men and women in modern India.


Concerned for his wife, who spends most of her days inside, Nikhil, an educated aristocrat, brings Bimala to a political rally. There, they hear the magnanimous revolutionary Sandip speak out against British imperialism and call for Indian independence. Although Nikhil remains passive, if not indifferent, regarding British rule, Bimala, who comes from a poor family, reaches a political awakening of her own. When Nikhil and Bimala invite Sandip to stay as a guest at their home, Bimala moves further away from her traditional role as a wife and begins to develop romantic feelings for the radical figure. Aware of his growing influence, Sandip places himself between Nikhil and his wife while secretly attempting to convince Bimala to use her husband’s wealth to support the Swadeshi cause. The Home and the World is a masterful novel that explores the personal behind the political, inserting the lives of individuals into history’s great wheel without losing sight of humanity.


With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Rabindranath Tagore’s The Home and the World is a classic of Indian literature reimagined for modern readers.


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Date de parution

23 février 2021

Nombre de lectures

0

EAN13

9781513276878

Langue

English

Poids de l'ouvrage

3 Mo

The Home and the World
Rabindranath Tagore

The Home and the World was first published in 1916.
This edition published by Mint Editions 2021.
ISBN 9781513271873 | E-ISBN 9781513276878
Published by Mint Editions®
minteditionbooks.com
Publishing Director: Jennifer Newens
Design & Production: Rachel Lopez Metzger
Translated (from Bengali to English) by Surendranath Tagore
Typesetting: Westchester Publishing Services

CONTENTS C HAPTER 1 Bimala’s Story C HAPTER 2 Bimala’s Story Nikhil’s Story Sandip’s Story C HAPTER 3 Bimala’s Story Sandip’s Story C HAPTER 4 Nikhil’s Story Bimala’s Story Sandip’s Story C HAPTER 5 Nikhil’s Story Bimala’s Story Nikhil’s Story C HAPTER 6 Nikhil’s Story Sandip’s Story C HAPTER 7 Sandip’s Story C HAPTER 8 Nikhil’s Story Bimala’s Story C HAPTER 9 Bimala’s Story C HAPTER 10 Nikhil’s story Bimala’s Story C HAPTER 11 Bimala’s Story C HAPTER 12 Nikhil’s Story Bimala’s Story

Chapter 1
Bimala’s Story
I
M OTHER, TODAY THERE COMES BACK to mind the vermilion mark 1 at the parting of your hair, the sari 2 which you used to wear, with its wide red border, and those wonderful eyes of yours, full of depth and peace. They came at the start of my life’s journey, like the first streak of dawn, giving me golden provision to carry me on my way.
The sky which gives light is blue, and my mother’s face was dark, but she had the radiance of holiness, and her beauty would put to shame all the vanity of the beautiful.
Everyone says that I resemble my mother. In my childhood I used to resent this. It made me angry with my mirror. I thought that it was God’s unfairness which was wrapped round my limbs—that my dark features were not my due, but had come to me by some misunderstanding. All that remained for me to ask of my God in reparation was, that I might grow up to be a model of what woman should be, as one reads it in some epic poem.
When the proposal came for my marriage, an astrologer was sent, who consulted my palm and said, “This girl has good signs. She will become an ideal wife.”
And all the women who heard it said: “No wonder, for she resembles her mother.”
I was married into a Rajah’s house. When I was a child, I was quite familiar with the description of the Prince of the fairy story. But my husband’s face was not of a kind that one’s imagination would place in fairyland. It was dark, even as mine was. The feeling of shrinking, which I had about my own lack of physical beauty, was lifted a little; at the same time a touch of regret was left lingering in my heart.
But when the physical appearance evades the scrutiny of our senses and enters the sanctuary of our hearts, then it can forget itself. I know, from my childhood’s experience, how devotion is beauty itself, in its inner aspect. When my mother arranged the different fruits, carefully peeled by her own loving hands, on the white stone plate, and gently waved her fan to drive away the flies while my father sat down to his meals, her service would lose itself in a beauty which passed beyond outward forms. Even in my infancy I could feel its power. It transcended all debates, or doubts, or calculations: it was pure music.
I distinctly remember after my marriage, when, early in the morning, I would cautiously and silently get up and take the dust 3 of my husband’s feet without waking him, how at such moments I could feel the vermilion mark upon my forehead shining out like the morning star.
One day, he happened to awake, and smiled as he asked me: “What is that, Bimala? What are you doing?”
I can never forget the shame of being detected by him. He might possibly have thought that I was trying to earn merit secretly. But no, no! That had nothing to do with merit. It was my woman’s heart, which must worship in order to love.
My father-in-law’s house was old in dignity from the days of the Badshahs . Some of its manners were of the Moguls and Pathans, some of its customs of Manu and Parashar. But my husband was absolutely modern. He was the first of the house to go through a college course and take his M.A. degree. His elder brother had died young, of drink, and had left no children. My husband did not drink and was not given to dissipation. So foreign to the family was this abstinence, that to many it hardly seemed decent! Purity, they imagined, was only becoming in those on whom fortune had not smiled. It is the moon which has room for stains, not the stars.
My husband’s parents had died long ago, and his old grandmother was mistress of the house. My husband was the apple of her eye, the jewel on her bosom. And so he never met with much difficulty in overstepping any of the ancient usages. When he brought in Miss Gilby, to teach me and be my companion, he stuck to his resolve in spite of the poison secreted by all the wagging tongues at home and outside.
My husband had then just got through his B.A. examination and was reading for his M.A. degree; so he had to stay in Calcutta to attend college. He used to write to me almost every day, a few lines only, and simple words, but his bold, round handwriting would look up into my face, oh, so tenderly! I kept his letters in a sandalwood box and covered them every day with the flowers I gathered in the garden.
At that time the Prince of the fairy tale had faded, like the moon in the morning light. I had the Prince of my real world enthroned in my heart. I was his queen. I had my seat by his side. But my real joy was, that my true place was at his feet.
Since then, I have been educated, and introduced to the modern age in its own language, and therefore these words that I write seem to blush with shame in their prose setting. Except for my acquaintance with this modern standard of life, I should know, quite naturally, that just as my being born a woman was not in my own hands, so the element of devotion in woman’s love is not like a hackneyed passage quoted from a romantic poem to be piously written down in round hand in a school-girl’s copy-book.
But my husband would not give me any opportunity for worship. That was his greatness. They are cowards who claim absolute devotion from their wives as their right; that is a humiliation for both.
His love for me seemed to overflow my limits by its flood of wealth and service. But my necessity was more for giving than for receiving; for love is a vagabond, who can make his flowers bloom in the wayside dust, better than in the crystal jars kept in the drawing-room.
My husband could not break completely with the old-time traditions which prevailed in our family. It was difficult, therefore, for us to meet at any hour of the day we pleased. 4 I knew exactly the time that he could come to me, and therefore our meeting had all the care of loving preparation. It was like the rhyming of a poem; it had to come through the path of the metre.
After finishing the day’s work and taking my afternoon bath, I would do up my hair and renew my vermilion mark and put on my sari , carefully crinkled; and then, bringing back my body and mind from all distractions of household duties, I would dedicate it at this special hour, with special ceremonies, to one individual. That time, each day, with him was short; but it was infinite.
My husband used to say, that man and wife are equal in love because of their equal claim on each other. I never argued the point with him, but my heart said that devotion never stands in the way of true equality; it only raises the level of the ground of meeting. Therefore the joy of the higher equality remains permanent; it never slides down to the vulgar level of triviality.
My beloved, it was worthy of you that you never expected worship from me. But if you had accepted it, you would have done me a real service. You showed your love by decorating me, by educating me, by giving me what I asked for, and what I did not. I have seen what depth of love there was in your eyes when you gazed at me. I have known the secret sigh of pain you suppressed in your love for me. You loved my body as if it were a flower of paradise. You loved my whole nature as if it had been given you by some rare providence.
Such lavish devotion made me proud to think that the wealth was all my own which drove you to my gate. But vanity such as this only checks the flow of free surrender in a woman’s love. When I sit on the queen’s throne and claim homage, then the claim only goes on magnifying itself; it is never satisfied. Can there be any real happiness for a woman in merely feeling that she has power over a man? To surrender one’s pride in devotion is woman’s only salvation.
It comes back to me today how, in the days of our happiness, the fires of envy sprung up all around us. That was only natural, for had I not stepped into my good fortune by a mere chance, and without deserving it? But providence does not allow a run of luck to last for ever, unless its debt of honour be fully paid, day by day, through many a long day, and thus made secure. God may grant us gifts, but the merit of being able to take and hold them must be our own. Alas for the boons that slip through unworthy hands!
My husband’s grandmother and mother were both renowned for their beauty. And my widowed sister-in-law was also of a beauty rarely to be seen. When, in turn, fate left them desolate, the grandmother vowed she would not insist on having beauty for her remaining grandson when he married. Only the auspicious marks with which I was endowed gained me an entry into this family—otherwise, I had no claim to be here.
In this house of luxury, but few of its ladies had received their meed of respect. They had, however, got used to the ways of the family, and managed to keep their heads above water, buoyed up by their dignity as Ranis of an ancient house, in spite of their daily tears being drowned in the foam of wine, and by the tinkle of the “dancing girls” anklets. Was the credit due to me that my husband did not touch liquor, nor squander his manhood in the m

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