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English

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298 pages
English
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Description

Emphasizing how profoundly the American research university has been shaped by business and the humanities alike, Ivy and Industry is a vital contribution to debates about the corporatization of higher education in the United States. Christopher Newfield traces major trends in the intellectual and institutional history of the research university from 1880 to 1980. He pays particular attention to the connections between the changing forms and demands of American business and the cultivation of a university-trained middle class. He contends that by imbuing its staff and students with seemingly opposed ideas-of self-development on the one hand and of an economic system existing prior to and inviolate of their own activity on the other-the university has created a deeply conflicted middle class.Newfield views management as neither inherently good nor bad, but rather as a challenge to and tool for negotiating modern life. In Ivy and Industry he integrates business and managerial philosophies from Taylorism through Tom Peters's "culture of excellence" with the speeches and writings of leading university administrators and federal and state education and science policies. He discusses the financial dependence on industry and government that was established in the university's early years and the equal influence of liberal arts traditions on faculty and administrators. He describes the arrival of a managerial ethos on campus well before World War II, showing how managerial strategies shaped even fields seemingly isolated from commerce, like literary studies. Demonstrating that business and the humanities have each had a far stronger impact on higher education in the United States than is commonly thought, Ivy and Industry is the dramatic story of how universities have approached their dual mission of expanding the mind of the individual while stimulating economic growth.

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Publié par
Date de parution 21 janvier 2004
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780822385202
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,2198€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

ivyandindustry
IVY AND INDUSTRY
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
b u s i n e s s a n d t h e m a k i n g o f t h e
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
a m e r i c a n u n i v e r s i t y, 1 8 8 0 – 1 9 8 0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHRISTOPHER NEWFIELD
d u k e u n i v e r s i t y p r e s s . . . . . .
Durham & London 2003
2003 Duke University Press
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States
ofAmericaonacid-freepaper$
DesignedbyAmyRuthBuchanan
Typeset in Carter & Cone Galliard by
Keystone Typesetting, Inc.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-
Publication Data appear on the last
printed page of this book.
CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
part insiMooisshTwTe
1. Introduction 3
2. A Permanent Dependence 15
3. The Humanist Outcry 41
part iihTaMeeganalrionCtidion
4. The Rise of University Management 67
5. Babbitry and Meritocracy 91
6. Managerial Protection and Scientific Success 115
7. Grey Flannel Radicals 133
part iiiivavteRraekehMlT
8. The Industry-Science Alliance 167
9. Corporate Pleasure and Business Humanism 195
10. Epilogue: The Second Story 215
Notes 229
Acknowledgments 277
Index 279
part i
TheTwoMissions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction
This book considers how the research university and the business corpo-ration grew up together, how they did and didn’t get along, and how each has shaped the other’s fate. The relationship has been complicated, and its stakes have been large. The research university has played a central role in establishing corporate capitalism and two of its major pillars, commercial technology and organizational management. The research university has also remained a major, if partial, outsider to this business system, having sought to support free inquiry and the pursuit of truth independently of what the market will buy. The university has had a double role to play, both sustaining and evading the remarkable rise of large organizations in nineteenth- and twentieth-century economic life.Ivy and Industrynarrates this aspect of the university’s intellectual and institutional history from approximately 1880 to 1980. These dates mark two defining moments in the country’s economic history, moments that might be described as business revolu-tions. The first revolution forged the multidivisional corporation, the factory labor system, and large-scale bureaucratic management. The sec-ond, at least on the surface, undid many of these innovations, allegedly inaugurating a more decentered ‘‘network’’ society that is arguably more dependent than ever on technological change. The first revolution brought the research university into being as industry’s indispensable adjunct. The e√ects of the second are still in the making. But it is already clear that this second revolution has challenged, if not undone, most of the bases that created the research university as we know it. This book is shaped by my long-term interest in how institutional and
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