51 pages
English

Followup Audit of the Awarding and Monitoring of Grants by the African Development Foundation

-

Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
51 pages
English
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL FOLLOWUP AUDIT OF AWARDING AND MONITORING OF GRANTS BY THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION AUDIT REPORT NO. 7-ADF-08-006-P JUNE 12, 2008 DAKAR, SENEGAL June 12, 2008 Lloyd Pierson President African Development Foundation 1400 I Street, NW Washington, DC 20005-2248 SUBJECT: Followup Audit of the Awarding and Monitoring of Grants by the African Development Foundation (Report No. 7-ADF-08-006-P) This letter transmits our final report on the subject audit. In finalizing the report, we carefully considered your comments on the draft report and we have included ADF’s comments in their entirety in appendix II of this report. Following the issuance of our draft report to you for comment, we combined former recommendation nos. 7, 8 and 9, recommendation nos. 13 and 14, and recommendation nos. 15 and 16, in order to reduce the number of recommendations and to simplify the audit follow-up process. The modifications were made to improve the clarity of the report and do not affect the actions that ADF needs to take. The report includes 18 recommendations for your action. Based on your comments and the documentation provided, we consider that management decisions have been reached on all recommendations except for recommendation no. 17. A management decision for recommendation no. 17 can be recorded when ADF has developed a firm plan of ...

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de lectures 29
Langue English

Extrait

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL
FOLLOWUP AUDIT OF AWARDING AND MONITORING OF GRANTS BY THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
AUDIT REPORT NO. 7-ADF-08-006-P JUNE 12, 2008
DAKAR, SENEGAL
June 12, 2008 Lloyd Pierson President African Development Foundation 1400 I Street, NW Washington, DC 20005-2248
SUBJECT:Followup Audit of the Awarding and Monitoring of Grants by the African Development Foundation (Report No. 7-ADF-08-006-P) This letter transmits our final report on the subject audit. In finalizing the report, we carefully considered your comments on the draft report and we have included ADF’s comments in their entirety in appendix II of this report. Following the issuance of our draft report to you for comment, we combined former recommendation nos. 7, 8 and 9, recommendation nos. 13 and 14, and recommendation nos. 15 and 16, in order to reduce the number of recommendations and to simplify the audit follow-up process. The modifications were made to improve the clarity of the report and do not affect the actions that ADF needs to take. The report includes 18 recommendations for your action. Based on your comments and the documentation provided, we consider that management decisions have been reached on all recommendations except for recommendation no. 17. A management decision for recommendation no. 17 can be recorded when ADF has developed a firm plan of action, with target dates, for implementing the recommendation. Determination of final action for the report recommendations will be made by the Foundation’s audit committee and we ask that we be notified upon completion of the proposed corrective actions. I appreciate the cooperation and courtesy extended to my staff throughout the audit. Sincerely,
Dennis Bryant /s/ Regional Inspector General/Dakar
Cc: Board of Directors, African Development Foundation
U.S. Agency for International Development Ngor Diarama Petit Ngor BP 49 Dakar, Senegal
CONTENTS Summary of Results....................................................................................................... 1 Background..................................................................................................................... 2 Audit Objective .................................................................................................................. 3 Audit Findings................................................................................................................. 4 Implementation of Projects Was Slow......................................................................... 5 Grantees’ Reporting Should Be Improved ..................................................................................................................... 8 Audits of Grantees Not Completed ........................................................................... 12 Audits Need to Comply with Appropriate Auditing Standards .................................................................................................... 13 Other Issues Noted During the Audit.......................................................................... 15 Several Grantees Suffered from Weak Financial Management Practices .............................................................................. 16 Capital Assets Not Properly Used for Intended Purposes .................................................................................................... 17 Indications of Fraud Not Reported to the Office of Inspector General ....................................................................................... 19 Lack of Compliance with Agreement Terms ........................................................................................................................ 21 Evaluation of Management Comments....................................................................... 24 Appendix I – Scope and Methodology........................................................................ 26 Appendix II – Management Comments. ...................................................................... 28 Appendix III – Further Illustrations.............................................................................. 44
SUMMARY OF RESULTS The Regional Inspector General/Dakar (RIG/Dakar) conducted this followup audit to determine whether the African Development Foundation (ADF) in Senegal took effective corrective actions with respect to 8 of the 11 recommendations of the audit titledAudit of Awarding and Monitoring of Grants by the African Development Foundation,Audit Report No. 9-ADF-03-005-P, issued February 28, 2003. (See page 2.) ADF in Senegal took adequate measures to close two of eight recommendations, which addressed the periodic evaluation of performance indicators and the submission of an annual audit plan to the Office of Inspector General. However, ADF did not take sufficient action to implement the other six recommendations and thus only partially addressed the weaknesses found in the prior audit. (See page 4.) The followup audit also disclosed that implementation of project activities was slow (page 5), that reported information on actual achievements was inaccurate or unsupported (page 8), that required financial audits were not conducted, (page 12) and that financial audit reports were not completed in accordance with accepted auditing standards. (See page 13.) Four other issues arose during the course of the audit that require corrective action by ADF. First, several grantees suffered from weak financial management practices. (See page 16.) Second, some capital assets were not used for their intended purposes. (See page 17.) Third, indications of fraud involving ADF funds were not reported to the Office of the Inspector General. (See page 19.) And finally, some grantees did not comply with some of the terms of the agreement. (See page 21.) This report contains 18 recommendations that will assist ADF in improving project implementation (see page 8), ensuring the quality of reported information on program accomplishments (see page 12) and ensuring that financial audits of grantees are conducted according to ADF’s stated policies. (See pages 13 and 15.) In addition, the report recommends that ADF strengthen the financial management practices of its grantees (see page 17), ensure that grantees use capital assets for intended purposes (see page 18), report irregularities and allegations of fraud to the Office of Inspector General (OIG) (see page 21) and improve grantees’ compliance with the terms of the agreement. (See page 23.) We believe that ADF’s comments and planned actions are responsive to the report recommendations. We consider that management decisions have been reached on all recommendations except for recommendation no. 17. Our evaluation of management comments is provided on page 24. ADF’s comments in their entirety are included in Appendix II.
1
BACKGROUND The African Development Foundation (ADF) is a U.S. Government corporation established by Congress in 1980. One of ADF’s primary goals is to enable the empowerment of the poor in Africa. ADF pursues this objective in part by providing grants tosmall enterprises that generate income and increase the economic security of families and communities.ADF also seeks to encourage economic development by providing capital, training, and other support. The grants are designed to increase the flow of investment capital to the poor.ADF provides grants of $250,000 or less to private and other nongovernmental entities in Africa to: Finance sustainable poverty-alleviating initiatives that are conceived, designed, and implemented by Africans and aimed at enlarging opportunities for community development; Stimulate and expand the participation of Africa's poor in the development of their countries; and Build sustainable African institutions that foster grassroots development. ADF currently operates in 18 African countries including Senegal. The ADF/Senegal program, established in 1986, is classified as a midsize program. The program focuses on small- and medium-sized enterprises, particularly projects with high export potential. At the end of the year 2007, ADF/Senegal’s portfolio contained 10 active projects, of which 3 were 1-year organizational assistance grants and 7 were development assistance projects. During the period from October 1, 2005 until December 31, 2007, ADF disbursed $1.6 million to ADF/Senegal in program activities. In 1999, Public Law 106-113 amended the responsibilities of the USAID Office of Inspector General, under Section 8A (a) of the Inspector General Act of 1978, to include audit responsibility for ADF. In FY 2002, the Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) Performance Audit Division conducted an audit to determine whether ADF had (1) evaluated and selected proposals for funding in accordance with ADF policies and procedures, (2) implemented a system to monitor the progress of grantee activities, and (3) implemented a system to audit funds provided to grantees. The results of the audit were presented in the reportAudit of Awarding and Monitoring of Grants by the African Development Foundation(Report No. 9-ADF-03-005-P) dated February 28, 2003. In that report, OIG concluded that ADF (1) did not always evaluate and select grant proposals for funding in accordance with its internal policies and procedures, (2) did not implement an effective system to monitor its projects and obtain project results, (3) did not implement an effective system to audit funds provided to grantees, and (4) did not have a process to ensure that all significant recommendations were tracked and implemented. OIG made 11 recommendations to correct these deficiencies. ADF concurred with the recommendations and proposed specific actions to remedy the deficiencies. At the time the final report was issued in February 2003, management decisions were reached on all recommendations, but final action to close the recommendations had not been taken. In
2
March 2007 ADF submitted documentation of final actions and the recommendations were closed.
AUDIT OBJECTIVE
The Regional Inspector General/Dakar (RIG/Dakar) performed this audit to answer the following question:
recommendations from Audit Report 9-ADF-03-005-P inDid ADF implement the Dakar, Senegal and were the actions taken by ADF/Senegal effective?
Appendix I contains a discussion of the audit's scope and methodology.
3
AUDIT FINDINGS Of the eight recommendations covered by this audit, ADF took adequate measures in Senegal to fully implement two of them. For the other six, ADF/Senegal did not fully implement the recommendations and some of the same concerns found during the first audit still remain. The following discuss the two recommendations that were fully implemented. Recommendation no. 4 of the previous audit report recommended that ADF establish policies requiring periodic evaluation of the performance indicators developed for each project to ensure that all indicators are necessary and relevant. ADF agreed and revised its monitoring and evaluation policy to ensure that performance indicators are reviewed during portfolio reviews1. The audit found that performance indicators were streamlined and were more directly related to project activities.
Women processing millet manually at ADF’s Ndiakhere project in St-Louis, Senegal. Photo taken by an OIG auditor on January 15, 2008. Recommendation no. 7 recommended that ADF provide its annual audit plan to the Office of Inspector General (OIG) by October 1 of each fiscal year (FY). In its response to the report, ADF agreed to submit its audit plan. The followup audit found that this recommendation had been fully implemented. Specifically, for FY 2007 and FY 2008, ADF prepared and sent its annual audit plan to OIG within the agreed timeframe. Although recommendation nos. 4 and 7 were fully implemented by ADF, the actions taken in response to recommendation nos. 3, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 were not fully implemented and only partially addressed the weaknesses found in the prior audit. The following sections of this audit report discuss these weaknesses and identify opportunities to improve project implementation and achievement of program objectives, and to ensure that funds are used for intended purposes.
1 Portfolio reviews are conducted by ADF/Washington portfolio managers to assess the status of grant projects.
4
Implementation of Projects Was Slow Summary: Recommendation no. 3 from the prior audit report recommended that ADF strengthen its oversight to improve project implementation. However, this audit found that ADF project implementation was slow and that no related remediation plans were developed. The slow implementation of projects was due to a number of factors including unrealistic expectations, a lack of monitoring, inappropriate or unused project equipment, and late funding. As a result of slow implementation, ADF projects did not meet their objectives. The previous audit report found that ADF needed to strengthen its oversight of projects to identify in a timely manner any problems associated with project implementation, remediate the problems, and, if warranted, terminate project grants. The previous report also found that there were no scheduled project implementation milestones that could trigger a full review of information on project implementation and possibly lead to a decision to terminate a project. To correct these deficiencies, recommendation no. 3 of the previous audit report recommended that ADF revise its policies on evaluating the grantees’ progress towards fulfilling grant objectives, facilitate prompt interventions in order to remediate problems in project implementation and conduct and document portfolio reviews.
The Bok Khalaat fish processing project had not achieved any of its project outputs such has complying with safety and health measures to export dried fish, developing a business plan and establishing a financial management system. The project had no record-keeping system to speak of, yet no remediation plan had been developed. Photo taken by an OIG auditor on January 17, 2008, in St-Louis, Senegal. Subsequent to the previous audit, ADF revised its policies on project oversight and developed procedures on developing remediation plans and conducting portfolio reviews. However, this followup audit found that during FY 2007, no steps were taken to identify and remediate problems associated with project implementation, nor were any grants of failing projects terminated. Although some projects made progress, none of the 10 active projects achieved all of their planned results. Only 8 of 50 expected results that were documented and verified were achieved as shown in table 1.
5
Table 1: FY 2007 Achievement of Planned Results Planned Results Results Project Results Tested Achieved Aboul Abass 5 2  0 Agriconcept 7 4 0 Bok K 0 10 halaat 1 0 Gabastri 6 5 0 Maison du Karit 4 La e 8 1 Maria Distribution 6 5 1 Ndiakhere 6 6 2 Tasdak 4 4 1 La Vivriere 6 4 1 WAW Vegetable 7 6 2 Total65 50 8 The most important factors contributing to the problematic implementation of the projects included the following: Unrealistic expectations — For four of seven development projects reviewed, ADF had not established reasonable expectations for production, sales and net profit. Expectations were set using unsupported data that overestimated the potential profitability and sustainability of the projects. Many grantees did not have adequate documentation supporting baseline data and had unrealistic targets. For example, during the life of a project, Ndiakhere, a cereal producer, was to have increased production levels from 110 tons to 696 tons (a multiple of 6) and net profit from $2,600 to $139,000 (a multiple of 54). Another grantee, Aboul Abass, a laundry service, was to have increased production from 29,872 to 419,447 pieces of cleaned clothes (a multiple of 14) and net profit from $4,700 to $145,300 (a multiple of 31). The lack of a monitoring system — ADF Policy 630 states that ADF and its partners2will monitor the activities and performance of all projects to ensure that projects are proceeding according to plan and to assist the grantees in identifying and addressing problems or issues that arise during the course of project implementation. However, ADF/Senegal and its partner did not implement an effective system to monitor project activities and record project achievements. A monitoring and evaluation plan was not developed to determine which activities should be monitored and how the activities should be monitored, including the number and frequency of site visits to be performed by ADF or the partners. Well-planned and documented visits would have helped ADF identify implementation problems and take remedial action. For example, West African WAGS Sea Vegetable (WAW Vegetable), a 1-year grant, was expected to improve financial management and develop a business plan. The project achieved two of its six planned results that we tested, which were to hire an accountant and a business manager both funded by ADF. However, neither the financial system nor the business 2development agencies entitled partner or partner organization to provideADF uses local support to grassroots entities. In Senegal, the partner Consultants Associes was responsible to provide technical assistance and monitoring oversight to existing ADF projects and aid new project reviews. 6
plan had been developed. Also, La Maison du Karite, a 1-year grant, achieved one of its four tested outputs but failed to produce the business plan or develop an adequate management system, yet ADF disbursed funding as late as December 2007 without evaluating the project and the capability of the grantee. These deficiencies could have been detected and remedial actions taken if monitoring visits were conducted and the project evaluated. No remediation plans — ADF Policy 632 states that a remediation plan is required when a project is falling significantly short of its objectives. However, ADF had not developed a remediation plan for any of its failing projects. Two failing projects Aboul Abass and Gabastri, were planning to make a major shift in project activities because their current project activities were not profitable. Aboul Abass was evaluating moving its laundry equipment from St-Louis to Mbourg (a 2-hour drive). Gabastri had reduced its staff from 11 to 7, and sales were limited to two products that were outdated and facing severe competition from China. Gabastri was planning to shift from producing door hinges to raising chickens. However, no remediation plan had been developed for either project.
An employee cutting soap by hand without gloves or clean equipment. La Maison du Karite, a cosmetic shea butter project had not improved its production processes because the new mill funded by ADF was not being used. The small cosmetic workshop had no running water and lacked simple hygienic standards. Photo taken by an OIG auditor in Dakar, Senegal on January 3, 2008. Late funding — Several grantees mentioned that the late disbursement of funds from ADF to the grantees impeded project activities. Some project activities were seasonal and the timing of the receipt of funding was important in order for the grantees to take advantage of low prices of raw materials. For example, Maria Distribution, a juice maker, needed to buy its fruits when prices were low and freeze them. If the funds are delayed, supplies may not be available or the prices may be high, thus reducing the chances that the project will be profitable and fulfill its objectives. Unused equipment —Most grantees had either not used ADF-funded equipment or had limited use for the equipment. (See finding on page 17.)
A women filling up bottles of syrup by hand at Maria Distribution, a juice maker. The grantee had not yet ordered its new equipment because the new processing unit was under construction. The construction should have been completed by September 2006 according to the agreement. Photo taken by an OIG auditor on January 10, 2008 in Dakar, Senegal.
7
Vacant positions — ADF/Senegal has been without a partner organization since July 2007 and without a country representative since December 2007. The regional coordinator provided support to ADF/Senegal but her assistance has been limited by the fact that other countries in the region were also without country representatives or partners. Also, ADF/Senegal did not have a position responsible for monitoring and coordinating the activities of the partner organization. As a result of these difficulties ADF could not measure the efficiency and effectiveness of its program in Senegal, reliably determine if projects were meeting objectives, or improve project implementation. ADF has implemented several activities aimed at speeding up project implementation, including meetings with grantees and conducting portfolio reviews. ADF-supported activities have been constructive but were not of sufficient magnitude to have a significant impact on project implementation. This audit makes the following recommendations to help ensure the early identification of problems and the rapid remediation, or, when warranted, the prompt termination of grants. Recommendation No. 1: We recommend that the African Development Foundation (a) set objectives with realistic expectations, (b) develop remediation plans for underperforming projects and, as warranted, terminate nonperforming grants, and (c) develop a monitoring and evaluation plan that includes evaluating each grantee’s progress toward meeting its objectives to facilitate timely interventions to improve project results. Recommendation No. 2: We recommend that the African Development Foundation take appropriate measures to disburse adequate funds to grantees in a timely manner. Recommendation No. 3: We recommend that the African Development Foundation take appropriate measures to fill the positions left vacant in Senegal in order to provide proper project oversight and monitoring. Grantees Reporting Should Be Improved Summary: The previous audit report found that ADF officials did not always review the grantees’ progress reports with sufficient care to ensure that reported data were accurate, complete, and useful. In its response to that audit, ADF agreed to continue to provide training to the grantees but also to simplify and revise the report format to facilitate reporting by grantees. However, the followup audit found that ADF’s grantees’  reporting was inaccurate, incomplete and unsupported. In 68 of the 84 results reviewed (81 percent), information on actual results reported by grantees was inaccurate or unsupported. These problems occurred because ADF staff members or the partner organization did not verify the grantees’ information and lacked clear guidance regarding their responsibility to systematically verify performance data and to document the results of these efforts. As a result, ADF could not reliably determine whether grantees were meeting their objectives or assess the impact of their program in Senegal. The prior audit report found that although grantees submitted the required progress reports, ADF officials did not always review the reports with sufficient care to ensure that the reported data were accurate, complete, and useful. Consequently, ADF did not always receive accurate and complete information about project progress and could not
8
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents
Alternate Text