2008 Georgia Grade 5 Writing Assessment Persuasive Sample Papers

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2008 Georgia Grade 5 Writing Assessment 2008 Georgia Grade 5 Writing Assessment Persuasive Sample Papers Persuasive Writing Topic 5116 Your class is discussing items that people use every day. Think of one item that you use every day. What would your life be like without it? Write a speech to convince your class that the item is important.
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  • exception of an occasional spelling error
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The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and
Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are available by using the Search Standards feature located on
GeorgiaStandards.Org.

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Physical Science – GRADE 8

Unit: Energy in Our Life
Sternberg Task
Magnetism for Me

Subject Area: Physical Science
Grade: 8

Standards (Content and Characteristics):

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds
of forces acting in nature.
c. Investigate and explain that electric currents and magnets can exert force on each other.

S8CS1. Students will explore the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in
science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.
a. Understand the importance of—and keep—honest, clear, and accurate records in science.
b. Understand that hypotheses can be valuable even if they turn out not to be completely accurate.

S8CS2. Students will use standard safety practices for all classroom laboratory and field
investigations.
a. Follow correct procedures for use of scientific apparatus.
b. Demonstrate appropriate techniques in all laboratory situations.
c. Follow correct protocol for identifying and reporting safety problems and violations.

S8CS5. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and
technological matters.
a. Observe and explain how parts can be related to other parts in a system such as the role of simple
machines in complex machines.
b. Understand that different models (such as physical replicas, pictures, and analogies) can be used to
represent the same thing.

S8CS8. Students will be familiar with the characteristics of scientific knowledge and how it is
achieved.
Students will apply the following to scientific concepts:
a. When similar investigations give different results, the scientific challenge is to judge whether the
differences are trivial or significant, which often requires further study. Even with similar results,
scientists may wait until an investigation has been repeated many times before accepting the
results as meaningful.

S8CS9. Students will understand the features of the process of scientific inquiry.
Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:
a. Investigations are conducted for different reasons, which include exploring new phenomena,
Georgia Department of Education
Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools
Physical Science GRADE 8 Energy in our Life
7-30-07 Page 1 of 12
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Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Physical Science – GRADE 8

confirming previous results, testing how well a theory predicts, and comparing different theories.
Scientific investigations usually involve collecting evidence, reasoning, devising hypotheses, and
formulating explanations to make sense of collected evidence.
b. Scientific investigations usually involve collecting evidence, reasoning, devising hypotheses, and
forma
c. Scientific experiments investigate the effect of one variable on another. All other variables are kept
constant.
d. Scientists often collaborate to design research. To prevent this bias, scientists conduct independent
studies of the same questions.

Enduring Understandings:

• Energy appears in different forms such as:
o mechanical energy,
o gravitational energy,
o heat energy, and
o electric and magnetic energy.
• Magnetic forces arise from the movement of electric charge.

Essential Questions:

• Scientists tell us that energy can’t be created or destroyed. If this is true, where does it come from
when we notice it and where does it go to when we don’t see any evidence of it?
• What’s the easiest or best way to describe or illustrate the kind of energy present in a magnet?
• If you met someone who had never seen or heard a speaker and had no idea of what energy is,
how would you explain the way it works?

Pre-Assessment:

Placing a CD-player or speaker in front of students, ask them to explain what is necessary for the device
to work. Listen for any mention of the word magnet or magnetism. Encourage students to draw pictures
explaining their ideas. Consider using a concept mapping tool such as those listed below to create a mind
map of what the students know about the topic.
• FreeMind at http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
• Mindomo at http://www.mindomo.com/
• CMap Tools at http://cmap.ihmc.us/download/free_client.php

Ask students to pick a question from those listed below and be prepared to make their best guess as to
answer. Allow the class to pick the most interesting question and have them write a short answer on a
sticky note. Afterwards, collect the stick notes and compare and categorize them by their similarities.
• How do magnets do all the crazy things they do?
• How is it that sometimes they get stuck to each other and other times they push away from one
another?
Georgia Department of Education
Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools
Physical Science GRADE 8 Energy in our Life
7-30-07 Page 2 of 12
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Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Physical Science – GRADE 8

• What makes magnetism possible in our world?
• Would magnets work the same way in outer space, on the moon, or another planet? Why or why
not?
• Is there any way to make a magnet more powerful than it already is? If so, how. If not, why not?
• Is there a way to turn a magnet’s power “off” if you decided to something like that? If so, why or
why not?
• Is it possible to create a magnet out of something that isn’t currently acting like a magnet? If so,
how?

Ask students to list the 10 most important words necessary for describing magnets and magnetism.

Have students create a “most wanted” poster for a “Mr. Magnet.” Ask that students supply:
• distinguishing characteristics/behaviors
• his haunts (where he can be found)
• any aliases (i.e., lodestone)
• his atomic “fingerprints”—what he’s made of
• disguises (what he might be hiding in—i.e., a speaker, a microphone, et cetera)

Ask students to choose one of the following questions to answer in their science journals:
• How serious would it be if we created a machine that could instantly destroy all magnets or
magnetic objects on the earth? What kinds of things might be affected?
• In comic books and movies, there are often villains and heroes with magnetic powers? What kinds
of things could these fanciful individuals do it they really existed? How could they use their
abilities for good (or ill)?Just for reference, and the sake of being knowledgeable about this topic,
here are a few such individuals in case students ask for specifics:
o Marvel Comic’s ™’ evil mutant, Magneto™’ http://www.marvel.com/universe/Magneto
o DC Comic’s™’ villainous Dr. Polaris™’ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Polaris, the
stcrime fighting teen from the 31 Century and member of the Legion of Super Heroes,
Cosmic Boy™’ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_Boy
• We often see science fiction movies and books that mention force fields. Do magnets have a force
field? If so, how might one look if we could see it?

ANALYTICAL PRACTICAL CREATIVE
Outcome/ Students will diagram Students will create a Students will draw
Performance magnetic field lines. “how to” guide for magnetic field lines
Expectations making a compass with around different kinds
Students will analyze common items. The of magnets and use
how a speaker works guide, when their diagrams in a
and the role a magnet successfully created short skit or
plays in producing can be sent home with demonstration in which
Georgia Department of Education
Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools
Physical Science GRADE 8 Energy in our Life
7-30-07 Page 3 of 12
Copyright 2007 © All Rights Reserved y
y
y

One Stop Shop For Teachers

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Physical Science – GRADE 8

ANALYTICAL PRACTICAL CREATIVE
sound. students for storage in a magnetism is discussed car’s glove and explained.
Students will create a compartment (the idea
motor and observe how being that, in the event Students will analyze,
forces of repulsion and a compass is needed, explain, and depict the
attraction cause the the instructions may role magnets play in
rotary movement of the prove useful). producing sound
motor. through speakers. They
Students will create will use their
Students will describe slideshow presentation knowledge to design a
the relationship explaining where the speaker.
between magnetism magnetic field lines for <

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